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Can Anyone REALLY Lower the High Costs of Healthcare?

Yes — but the solution may surprise you.
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You can’t control many of the factors that contribute to high healthcare costs: expensive drugs, the cost of providers, rising insurance premiums. It may seem like there’s not a lot anyone can do, other than pay up. So what can you do?

On the surface, the solution is simple. Less illness. Fewer claims. Better use of the healthcare system. Easier said than done — but it can be done. How?

By improving health literacy, or the ability to understand and act on health information. Sign up for our free webinar and we’ll show you how.

Register now! Improving Health Literacy: What Works & What Doesn’t. Wednesday, October 3, 2018.

Consider the facts:

  • 1 in 3 Americans can’t read a drug label.
  • Only 15% of adults with low health literacy know how to find good medical info online.
  • People with low health literacy are more likely to go without flu shots, mammograms, and other preventive care.

Knowing what to do to prevent chronic disease, how to take medications, and where to go when you’re sick — and acting on that knowledge — can have a huge impact on both personal health and the number of costly healthcare claims.

Low health literacy costs more. High health literacy costs less.

How do you improve health literacy?

Learn how by signing up for our free webinar! Join health literacy expert Dr. Russell Rothman and gamification guru Dr. Brian Primack as they discuss real-life strategies for improving health literacy. Find out what works — and what doesn’t.

Improving Health Literacy: What Works & What Doesn’t
Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Register now! Improving Health Literacy: What Works & What Doesn’t. Wednesday, October 3, 2018.

Even if you can’t make it, sign up anyway. We’ll send you a recording of the webinar. Invite your friends, too — and anyone who could benefit from lower healthcare costs!


PANELISTS

Brian Primack, MD, PhDBrian A. Primack, MD, PhD
Dean, University Honors College
Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics
Director, Center for Research on Media, Technology, and Health
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Primack has received many awards for research, teaching, and overall achievement, including the highest awards for emerging researchers offered by the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine and the Society of Behavioral Medicine. His TEDTalk, “Staying Healthy Might Be All Fun and Games” — given at the 2014 TEDMED conference in San Francisco — shows how video game principles can inspire changes in health behavior. His work has been cited in international news publications like The New York Times, NPR, U.S. News and World Report, the BBC, and The International Herald Tribune.

Russell L. Rothman, MD, MPPRussell L. Rothman, MD, MPP
Vice President for Population Health Research
Director of the Center for Health Services Research
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee

Dr. Rothman’s research focuses on improving care for adults and children with diabetes, obesity, and other chronic diseases. His work addresses health communication, health literacy and numeracy, and other social and behavioral factors to improve health. He has been the Principal Investigator on over $50 million in funded research and has authored over 130 manuscripts.


MODERATOR

Fred S. GoldsteinFrederic S. Goldstein
President and Founder
Accountable Health
Jacksonville, Florida

Fred’s consulting practice focuses on Population Health and the intersection of health system design, data, and analytics and behavior change. He serves on the Graduate Faculty of the John D. Bower School of Population Health at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, the editorial board of the journal Population Health Management, the founding Advisory Board of Population Health News, the Best Practices Review Panel for the Institute for Medicaid Innovation, and as a judge for the Health Value Awards.

Register now! Improving Health Literacy: What Works & What Doesn’t. Wednesday, October 3, 2018.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How Telemedicine Works

Get medical help without seeing a doctor in person
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Talk to a doctor without seeing them in person

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Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

Healthy Habits

It's never too late to change a bad habit ... or adopt a new good habit!
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Get over bad habits, get new good habits!

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Subscribe now. Know when we publish our latest articles on health literacy, gamification, and healthcare.

Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

The Amazon-JPMorgan-Berkshire Hathaway Health Announcement

Press Release Contains Few Specifics
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On January 30th, three American business giants announced a partnership “to address healthcare for their U.S. employees, with the aim of improving employee satisfaction and reducing cost.” The three companies – Amazon, JPMorgan and Berkshire Hathaway – are known for innovation and it’s clear that the scale of their partnership could be a disrupter to the healthcare industry.

But with few if any specifics around what the three companies would actually build or create, the buzz created by the announcement quickly led to more questions.

From the press release…

“The initial focus of the new company will be on technology solutions that will provide U.S. employees and their families with simplified, high-quality and transparent healthcare at a reasonable cost.

Tackling the enormous challenges of healthcare and harnessing its full benefits are among the greatest issues facing society today. By bringing together three of the world’s leading organizations into this new and innovative construct, the group hopes to draw on its combined capabilities and resources to take a fresh approach to these critical matters.”

The lack of specifics didn’t deter media outlets, industry experts and elected officials from making speculations.

At Vox, Dylan Scott suggested the announcement might mean that the companies would become self-insured and “take all the administrative responsibility of running a health plan, rather than contract it out to a third party.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) who is no stranger to promoting out-of-box solutions for health care interpreted the announcement differently and wondered if this could be the start of some businesses embracing the changes for which he’s been advocating.

“Could this be the beginning of the American business community understanding that a not-for-profit Medicare for All, single payer system makes sense not only for the average American, but for the business community as well”, Sanders Tweeted.

At CNN Money, Tami Luhby speculated that Amazon could utilize its expertise and experience in optimizing distribution and supply channels.

What is known is that the yet-to-be-named initiative/company is being spearheaded by Todd Combs of Berkshire Hathaway, Marvelle Sullivan Berchtold of JPMorgan Chase and Beth Galetti of Amazon.

Look for updates here as more information is released.

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Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

New Definition of High Blood Pressure

Changes in Guidelines Affect Millions
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In hopes that patients will talk to their doctors about high blood pressure and possible treatments sooner, heart experts have changed the guidelines for the condition. The changes will greatly increase the number of US adults who have high blood pressure.

High bold pressure is now defined as a reading of 130 over 80 and above. Previously a reading of 140 over 90 and above was the definition of high blood pressure. This is the first time in 14 years that the definition has changed.

With the change in guidelines, the percent of US adults living with high blood pressure increased to 46% from 32%. That is nearly half of all adults. And younger adults – those under 45 – saw even bigger increases.

Many people live with high blood pressure and don’t know it. Getting a blood pressure reading by a health professional is the only way to know for sure – there are usually no signs or symptoms. Some symptoms may appear if blood pressure rises or falls quickly:

  • Dull headaches
  • Dizzy spells
  • Unusual nosebleeds

High blood pressure can be deadly if not treated, so it is important to take a diagnosis seriously. Lifestyle changes can help control high blood pressure:

  • Don’t smoke or use other tobacco products
  • Limit use of ibuprofen and aspirin
  • Keep a healthy weight
  • Exercise regularly – try to get it 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week

Talk to a health professional to get more information about high blood pressure.

 

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Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes.