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Healthy Workday Recipes

Avoid break room diet traps. These tasty options will get you through your day—no vending machines required.
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It’s Monday morning at work, and there, next to the coffee machine sits a fresh box of Krispy Kremes, gleaming in their sugary glaze, daring you to take one—and because you skipped breakfast, you help yourself to two. Hours later and on a tight deadline, you power through lunch, grabbing chips and a soda from the vending machines. At 3 pm it’s back to the break room again, this time for homemade cupcakes in honor of a co-worker’s birthday.

By the end of the day, you’re in a serious energy slump from too much sugar and too many empty calories—fatigued, cranky, and in need of serious nutrition.

Sound familiar? Whether you’re trying to lose weight or simply eat healthier, the employee break room can be a minefield. But help is on the way. With just a little preparation and planning, you can make your own healthy, tasty choices. The recipes that follow—one for a delicious smoothie, another for a satisfying lunchtime salad, and a third for an easy, protein-packed snack—will help get you through your day.

Peanut Butter and Banana Smoothie

Need some morning motivation? This easy smoothie will do the trick. Soy milk has no cholesterol or lactose, so it’s a heart-healthy choice that’s easy on your stomach, too. Bananas and a touch of molasses add sweetness. For extra smoothness, blend the bananas and soy milk before adding the yogurt.

Serving size: 1 ½ cups

Makes 1 serving.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened soy milk
  • 2 bananas, sliced into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup vanilla fat-free yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon molasses

Instructions

Combine soy milk, bananas and peanut butter in a blender; process until smooth. Add yogurt and molasses and process for a few more seconds.

Nutrition: Calories 242, total fat 7.3 g, saturated fat 1.8 g, mono fat 2.6 g, poly fat 3.5 g, protein 11 g, carbs 38 g, fiber 5.4 g, sodium 107 mg, calcium 242 mg
 


More Healthy Recipes:

Lunchtime: Edamame Quinoa Salad Recipe

Spicy Snack: Asian-Inspired Nuts Recipe

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Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

Edamame Quinoa Salad Recipe

Swap packaged lunchtime noodle bowls for this filling, protein-rich salad.
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This main-dish salad features edamame, a type of soybean often used in Asian cooking. Look for it in the produce or frozen food sections of your grocery. You can find quinoa, a good source of fiber and protein, in the rice aisle. If you’re making this salad ahead for a brown-bag lunch, pack the dressing separately to keep the lettuce fresh and crisp.

Serving size: 1 ½ cups

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 cups torn romaine lettuce
  • 2 cups cooked quinoa
  • 1 cup fresh shelled edamame
  • 1 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped cashews
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Combine the lettuce, quinoa, edamame and red bell pepper in a medium bowl. Top with cashews. Whisk together the olive oil, red wine vinegar and salt until blended and toss with salad mixture.

Nutrition

Calories 320, total fat 11.2 g, saturated fat 2.1 g, mono fat 5.7 g, poly fat 2 g, protein 11 g, carbs 62 g, fiber 12 g, sodium 520 mg

 


More Healthy Recipes:

Spicy Snack: Asian-Inspired Nuts

Start The Day Right: Peanut Butter Banana Smoothie

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Subscribe now. Know when we publish our latest articles on health literacy, gamification, and healthcare.

Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

Asian-Inspired Nuts Recipe

Resist vending machine temptation with this spicy workday snack.
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Chinese five-spice powder is a tasty mix of cinnamon, fennel, cloves, star anise and Szechuan pepper. It adds flavor to this snack without a lot of fat. Store the nuts in an airtight container and portion out a couple of tablespoons at a time.

Serving size: 1 tablespoon

Makes 20  servings

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almonds
  • 1 cup macadamia nuts
  • 1 cup pecans
  • 4 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300°F. Place almonds, macadamia nuts and pecans in separate baking sheets and bake, stirring frequently, until browned and fragrant. (The almonds should bake for around 25 min, the macadamia nuts for around 18 min, and the pecans will bake for around 20 minutes.)

Reduce the oven heat to 250°F. Combine the toasted nuts, soy sauce, olive oil, sesame oil and Chinese five-spice powder and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake about 15 minutes, until nuts are darkened.

Nutrition

Calories 137, total fat 9.2 g, saturated fat 1.2 g, mono fat 6 g, poly fat 2.6 g, protein 4 g, carbs 7.2 g, fiber 2 g, sodium 32

 


More Healthy Recipes:

Lunchtime: Edamame And Quinoa Salad

Start The Day Right: Peanut Butter Banana Smoothie

Never miss a post.

Subscribe now. Know when we publish our latest articles on health literacy, gamification, and healthcare.

Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes. 

Improving Health Literacy On A Global Scale

International Health Literacy Association Coordinating Global Efforts
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More and more people are talking about health literacy across the globe. Experts in medicine, government and public policy are continuing to expand their understanding of the incredible opportunity that increasing health literacy can have in improving health and health outcomes.

Some of the many challenging characteristics of global low health literacy populations include:

  • An inability to access information about medical or clinical topics
  • An inability to understand, evaluate and follow medical information
  • An inability to make good decisions about their health
  • An inability to locate and understand information about risk factors
  • An inability to follow basic instructions on treatments and care.

At the recent Health Literacy Conference presented by Wisconsin Literacy in Madison, Wisconsin, luminaries and academics in the area of health literacy met to discuss how to better address the global challenges and costs associated with low health literacy. In a panel led by the International Health Literacy Association (IHLA), the organization shared its goals and tactics for addressing this global issue.

“The International Health Literacy Association (IHLA) is a member-based association for professional development within the health literacy field. IHLA serves a diverse range of stakeholders, medicals, public health professionals, educators, as well as many others engaged in health literacy, research, policy, education and practice.”

While research is being conducted across the globe, there is currently little coordination of these efforts or even the sharing of critical data and findings. Not surprisingly, much of this research is carried out within very homogenous populations. This makes the global relevancy of any accumulated data a relatively complex topic.

The IHLA seeks to help in a number of ways:

  • Author and publish peer reviewed journals on the subject of health literacy research
  • Become the go-to aggregator of health literacy activities, projects and practices worldwide
  • Encourage cross-national collaboration
  • Become the “keeper” of health literacy’s best practices
  • Advocate for global health literacy awareness
  • Raise public awareness about the need to increase health literacy

The IHLA launched with meeting in North America, Asia and Europe. They are currently developing a schedule for upcoming meetings and initiatives. They are also forming work groups and creating a more formal organizational structure. Health professionals who wish to become involved can visit http://www.i-hla.org for more information.

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Subscribe now. Know when we publish our latest articles on health literacy, gamification, and healthcare.

Jerry Gulley currently serves as EdLogics’ Chief Content Officer. He trained at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York and has held positions with Cooking Light, Health, and AllRecipes.